Chapter 15:                     

Protein

 

Proteins provide the structure for all living things.

Each living organism is composed of protein; from the largest of animals, to the smallest of cells. In the human body, protein matter makes up the organs, muscles, ligaments, nails, hair, vital bodily fluids, and glands and these proteins are critical for the development of bones. Next to water, protein makes up the greatest portion of our body weight

The hormones and enzymes that catalyze (cause or speeds a chemical change) and control all bodily processes are proteins. Proteins also assist in the exchange of nutrients between the cellular fluids and the tissues, blood and lymph. The genetic code contained in each cellís DNA is actually information on how to make the cellís protein.

Even though it sounds like it is just one substance, protein is really a combination of many chemicals called amino acids. The protein that we eat is broken down into amino acids, which the body then uses to build specific proteins needed for the body. Proteins are chains of amino acids that have been linked together. Each individual protein is composed of a specific group of amino acids, in a specific order. That specific order is what gives the proteins their exact functions and characteristics.

Scientists have found 20 different amino acids in protein, and these 20 amino acids can join together to make thousands of different proteins.

At least 10,000 different proteins make you what you are, and keep you that way. Each protein is made for a specific need. Proteins are not interchangeable.

Following genetic instructions, the body strings together amino acids. Some genes call for short chains, others are blueprints for long chains that fold, origami-like, into intricate, three-dimensional structures. Because the body doesn't store amino acids, as it does fats or carbohydrates, it needs a daily supply of amino acids to make new protein.

Some types of amino acids are made inside the body, these are called nonessential amino acids, of which there are 11. They are necessary, needed to keep your body functioning properly but are not essential as part of the food you eat.

The essential amino acids, of which there are nine, must come from food. That is why eating foods with protein is of the utmost importance, we must give our bodyís that which it needs, the amino acids. 

It's easy to get the protein your body needs. Protein is found in tasty, satisfying foods like meat, chicken, fish, eggs, nuts, cheese, lentils and peas!

Adults need a minimum of 1 gram of protein for every kilogram of body weight per day to keep from slowly breaking down their own tissues. That's about 9 grams of protein for every 20 pounds (the average female will requires a minimum of 50 to 70 grams per day and the average male a minimum of 80 to 100 grams).

Around the world, millions of people don't get enough protein. This protein malnutrition leads to the condition known as kwashiorkor. Lack of protein can cause growth failure, loss of muscle mass, decreased immunity, weakening of the heart and respiratory system, and death. 

All protein isn't alike

Some of the protein you eat contains all the amino acids needed to construct new proteins. 

This kind is called complete protein. Animal sources of protein tend to be complete.

Other protein sources lack one or more amino acids that the body can't make from scratch or create by modifying another amino acid; these are called incomplete proteins, usually found in fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts. Vegetarians need to be aware of this difference. To get all the amino acids needed to make new protein, and thus to keep the body's systems in good shape, people who don't eat meat, fish, poultry, eggs, or dairy products should eat a variety of protein-containing foods each day.
 

Protein and chronic disease

 

  • In the Nurses' Health Study, women who ate the most protein (about 110 grams per day) were 25 percent less likely to have had a heart attack or to have died of heart disease than the women who ate the least protein (about 68 grams per day) over a 14-year period. Whether the protein came from animals or vegetables--or whether it was part of low-fat or higher-fat diets--didn't seem to matter. 
  • These results offer reassurance that eating a lot of protein doesn't harm the heart. In fact, it is possible that eating more protein while cutting back on easily digested carbohydrates may be beneficial to the heart.

 

 

  • A diet that includes more protein and less carbohydrate is more effective for losing weight or keeping weight steady than a high-carbohydrate diet. Eating high-protein foods such as beef, chicken, fish, or beans makes you feel fuller longer; they slow the movement of food from the stomach to the intestine, which delays the hunger signals. 
  • The digestion of protein, when compared to that of carbohydrates, results in smaller, steadier increases in blood sugar. This helps avoid the steep climbs and drops in blood sugar--which trigger hunger pangs that occur after eating, rapidly digested carbohydrates.

 

Nuts for the Heart:

Many people think of nuts as just another junk food snack. In reality, nuts are excellent sources of protein and other healthful nutrients.

People who regularly eat nuts are less likely to have heart attacks or die from heart disease than those who rarely eat them. Studies have concluded that people who eat nuts several times a week have a consistent 30 to 50 percent lower risk of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, or cardiovascular disease.

There are several ways that nuts could have such an effect. 

The unsaturated fats they contain help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and raise HDL (good) cholesterol. 

One group of unsaturated fat found in walnuts, the omega-3 fatty acids, appears to prevent the development of erratic heart rhythms. Omega-3 fatty acids (which are also found in fatty fish such as salmon and bluefish) may also prevent blood clots, much as aspirin does. 

Nuts are rich in arginine, an amino acid needed to make a molecule called nitric oxide that relaxes constricted blood vessels and eases blood flow. They also contain vitamin E, folic acid, potassium, fiber, and other healthful nutrients.

Dietary Sources of Protein                                                          

FOOD  SERVING  SIZE                 WEIGHT in grams PROTEIN    in grams % Daily Value
Steak 6 ounces 170 49.1 98
Hamburger, extra lean 6 ounces 170 48.6 97

Chicken, roasted

6 ounces

170

42.5

85

Fish

6 ounces

170

41.2

82

Tuna, water packed

6 ounces

170

40.1

80

Beefsteak, broiled

6 ounces

170

38.6

77

Cottage cheese

1 cup

225

28.1

56

Cheese pizza

2 slices

128

15.4

31

Yogurt, low fat

8 ounces

227

11.9

24

Tofu

1/2 cup

126

10.1

20

Lentils, cooked

1/2 cup

99

9

18

Skim milk

1 cup

245

8.4

17

Split peas, cooked

1/2 cup

98

8.1

16

Whole milk

1 cup

244

8

16

Lentil soup

1 cup

242

7.8

16

Kidney beans, cooked

1/2 cup

87

7.6

15

Cheddar cheese

1 ounce

28

7.1

14

Macaroni, cooked

1 cup

140

6.8

14

Soymilk

1 cup

245

6.7

13

Egg

1 large

50

6.3

13

Whole wheat bread

2 slices

56

5.4

11

White bread

2 slices

60

4.9

10

Rice, cooked

1 cup

158

4.3

9

Broccoli, cooked

5 inch piece

140

4.2

8

Baked potato

2x5 inches

156

3

6

Corn, cooked

1 ear

77

2.6

5

One may recall that ďA Second OpinionĒ offers the unrestricted consumption of proteins and highly recommends the unlimited consumption of most vegetables. 

It also calls for the elimination of sugars and the restriction of carbohydrates to 20 grams per day.

I would be remiss if I didn't take this opportunity to remind my readers of the healthful properties and unlimited value to be received in the consumption of "i26 Fit ",  an innovative and proprietary meal replacement, "snack", and advanced high protein, fiber enriched recovery drink (containing i26 which is designed to address imbalances in your body's metabolic, immune, intestinal,  and hormonal systems).

                               

                     i26 (pure Hyperimmune egg powder) and Fit (with i26) 

can be consumed on an unrestricted basis, in accordance to the precepts of  "A Second Opinion" diet.

A serving of i26, is equal to 4.5 grams (approximately 1/3) of an enhanced egg, containing no other  dietary restrictions than those of conventional eggs (allergies) 

A serving of "Fit", besides having approximately 1/3rd of the daily allowance of most vitamins and minerals, contains 20 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber, and a serving of i26 included in it's formulation, has less than 1 gram of sugar and 7 grams of total carbohydrates (2 net grams of carbs), making it the perfect compliment to "the Second Opinion diet"

 

IgY Recovery Protein

"A new and specific class of protein has been developed by Legacy for Life, that leads to shorter recovery time, less muscle soreness and better overall performance, Igy Recovery Proteins."

 

For more information on Legacy for Life's newest product... 

please refer to Chapter 14... Exercise:

 

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